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The Paleo Diet and the Gluten Free Lifestyle

The Paleo diet promotes an eating plan based on ten thousand years of healthful eating. Because our ancestors were hunter-gatherers before they were any other type of eater, the theory says that our bodies must be intended to eat this way.
The Paleo diet consists of:
wild-caught meats
wild-caught fish and seafood
wild-harvested berries and fruits
wild-harvested seeds and nuts
wild-harvested mushrooms
wild-harvested flowers, leaves, stems, and roots.
All foods are fresh, whole, minimally processed foods, with no pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, or other chemicals, antibiotics, hormones, or artificial genetic modifications. The Paleo diet does not recommend eating grains, legumes, or other cultivated plants or farmed animals, including dairy.

Is the Paleo Diet Compatible With the Gluten Free Lifestyle?

In a word, yes, with this caveat: Always be mindful about what you eat. Although grains are not part of the Paleo diet, our food still comes, at least in part, from stores. If it is packaged and requires a label, you must read that label. Of course, if it's packaged, it's not recommended by the Paleo diet in any case.
If you have an autoimmune disease, or have another serious health condition, talk to your health care practitioner about switching to the Paleo diet. Although most people have no difficulties with it, you need to consult with your doctor, nurse, or nutritionist to be sure it's safe for you.
Do not begin the Paleo diet or any other high-protein, low-carb diet if you have lowered kidney function or your kidneys are in some other way compromised, without the supervision of a qualified health care practitioner.
Living gluten free means having a certain mindfulness about your shopping, cooking, and eating; following the Paleo diet merely requires that same mindfulness.

What Are the Benefits of the Paleo Diet?

The Paleo diet, for most people, can correct health concerns and improve their health in noticeable and significant ways. For example, the Paleo diet can:
* increase the body's pH and alkalinize the tissues, slowing or stopping bone demineralization caused by an acidic condition in the body;
* reduce inflammation in the vascular system by increasing alkalinity;
* lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels because vascular inflammation is reduced;
* increase vascular elasticity because of increased vitamin C intake from fresh plant foods, thereby lowering blood pressure (because of the increased vascular elasticity);
* normalize hormone production via lowered stress hormone production due to lower levels of physical/chemical stress on the body from inflammation;
* normalize insulin/glucose levels by reducing chronic intake of simple carbs;
* increase energy and reduce fatigue because the digestive system, along with the other excretory systems, is functioning optimally, and the body's mitochondria are being nourished adequately.
So you see, there are many good reasons to consider the Paleo diet.
Because humans have different body types, some people will thrive on the Paleo diet more than others will. For those who thrive, they will easily lose weight, gain abundant energy, increase muscle tone, mass, and strength, and increase their overall health and well-being. For the others, they may feel some dissatisfaction with their food selection, and they may not lose weight as easily, or thrive.
If you find you are one of these people who do not thrive on the Paleo diet, try a diet high in complex carbohydrates like fresh fruits and veggies, whole grains like buckwheat and quinoa, nuts such as cashews, pistachios, almonds, walnuts, and filberts, and small amounts of meats, eggs, and dairy. You may find this diet suits your personality and body type better.

The Bottom Line

In general, the Paleo diet should be safe for those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten intolerance. Do check with your health care practitioner if you have concerns. As a grain free diet, it should help heal your body and feed your soul.

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