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Showing posts from May, 2014

10 Filipino foods that define the Philippines

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Filipino food may not be as famous as that of its Thai and Vietnamese neighbors. But with more than 7,000 islands and a colorful history, this archipelago has some delicious dishes of its own.

Blessed with an abundance of seafood, tropical fruits and creative cooks, there’s more to Filipino food than the mind-boggling balut (duck embryo).

You just have to know where to find them and how to eat them.

1. Adobo
No list of Filipino food would be complete without adobo.

A ubiquitous dish in every household in the Philippines, it's Mexican in origin, but Filipinos found that cooking meat (often chicken and pork) in vinegar, salt, garlic, pepper, soy sauce and other spices, was a practical way to preserve meat without refrigeration.

This cooking style can be applied to different meats or even seafood. Sample it in a Filipino home or the garlicky version of the lamb adobo at Abe.

2. Lechon


The lechon is the most invited party guest in the Philippines. The entire pig is spit-roasted over …

Does spicy food really cause ulcers?

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Suppose that one day you discover a great love of Indian cuisine. You try to eat it at least once a week, sometimes more, and enjoy a big spread of curries and chutneys. But after six months or so of your Indian eating extravaganza, you run into a problem. A few hours after dinner, you get a burning pain in your stomach. When you discuss this problem with a friend, she suggests that all of that spicy food may have given you an ulcer.

For decades, doctors believed that ulcers, or peptic ulcer disease (PUD), were caused by eating lots of spicy or highly acidic foods (along with smoking, drinking alcohol, poor eating habits and stress). People who developed ulcers were put on strict, bland diets. Boring food, however, didn't seem to cure the pain.

In the early 1980s, researchers discovered that none of these factors cause ulcers, although they can irritate existing ones. Your burning stomach pain could be an ulcer, but not because you started eating Indian food. It's also possib…

Top 6 Exotic Foods You Must Try Once in Your Life

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When it comes to yummy exotic food, we think of the classics: eating a poutine in a Montreal restaurant, chowing down on green curry in Thailand, butter chicken in India and so on. But international cuisine is full of delicious dishes that you might not know about yet. ES guest Caroline Simpson joins us for a look at the top 6 exotic foods you must try once in your life.
1. Aligot, France


Granted, this may not be the finest of French dishes. But in the “comfort food” category, aligot scores major points. Those who dig cheese are going to love this one: Melted fresh “Tomme” cheese (some kind of super fresh cheddar), potatoes, cream, butter, garlic… this thick and gooey cheese paste is simply delicious. (Photo: Tavallai)
2. Kobe Beef, Japan

This world famous Japanese delicacy is a definite must-try… if you can afford it! A portion of this fancy treat can cost up to $300,00. Kobe beef is made from Tajima cattle, raised in very strict and meticulous conditions in the Hyogo prefecture in …

5 fatty foods that will help you stay healthy

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Always choosing low-fat foods? Don't fall for the fat-free trap. Instead, choose these sources of healthy fat to feed your body and stay satiated, too..

Fat isn't the bad guy. Although we associate dietary fat with weight gain and heart disease, some types of fat are good for us. The key is choosing the right fat and eschewing the bad. Here's the lowdown on "good" versus "bad" fats—and five great sources of healthy fats everyone should include in his/her daily diet. "Good" fats vs. "bad" fats According to the Harvard School of Public Health, when it comes to weight gain or disease, the type of fat you consume is more important than the amount of fat you consume.
"Bad" fats such as trans fat and saturated fat (found in processed food, and, in smaller amounts, red meat and whole-milk dairy) increase your risk of certain diseases like obesity, stroke and heart disease.

"Good" monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats…

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